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What tax advantage does life insurance offer?

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Compliant content provided by Adviceon® Media for educational purposes only.


There are specific life insurance policies offered with attractive tax-planning advantages. Legal tax-exempt rights are allowed in our tax legislation with life insurers, enabling the possibility to accomplish the following.

  • Premiums over and above the associated costs of insurance and premium tax are invested and can accumulate tax-deferred within specific plans.
  • Tax-deferral of the investments continue until such time that withdrawals are taken out from the policy.
  • Tax is avoided on both the face amount of the insurance and any ongoing cash accumulation in the policy when paid out to the beneficiaries on the insured’s death.

Taxation details. Most of the cash received from a life insurance contract is not subject to income tax. Your beneficiaries — spouse, children, grandchildren or other beneficiary allocated will not need to report life insurance benefit proceeds on their tax return as taxable income. However, if you have assigned your estate as the beneficiary, the death benefit could be subject to tax. Moreover, fiscal gifts or inheritances generally are not taxable. 

Beneficiaries or heirs do not owe estate inheritance tax or death tax. It is the estate of the deceased that pays any such tax due to the government. If the policy owner’s estate is the policy’s beneficiary, the death benefit may — in some cases be subject to tax. 2 

When could a taxable situation arise?

When you own a permanent life insurance policy, accumulating interest or equity investments made to a policy’s cash value, taxes will be payable on that growth gained above the cost base of money invested. 3 

Upon your beneficiaries receiving any investment earnings from the policy, along with a death benefit, the increase on investments, not the death benefit, would be taxable as income.

Likewise, you will pay taxes on any increase in cash value based on the investments in the policy fund — should you surrender the policy and receive its cash value in return. 

Tax Reporting Rules for Life Insurance Payouts

The Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA) makes receiving life insurance proceeds easy for beneficiaries relative to tax reporting. Unless the tax is due on the above-stated earnings, these amounts do not need reporting as taxable income on a tax return.

What if there is an increase in the cash value? 

These amounts don’t need reporting as taxable income on a tax return unless some tax is due on interest earnings. If there are interest earnings, it will be reported to the beneficiary by the insurance company on a T5 slip, reportable on line 121 of the beneficiary’s return (or of the policy owner when surrendering the cash value of the policy).

Here are some uses within an estate:

  • Final tax liabilities in an estate such as on capital property or the remaining RRSP/RRIF value is taxed fully as income and can be pre-funded.
  • In some cases, tax-exempt plans are used as a pledge to secure a loan to create additional cash flow in retirement. Cash resulting from a loan is not taxable. Where the loan is later paid from the death benefit, payment can be deferred until death. Repayment of the loan is thus partly repaid using pre-taxed dollars.

Others may borrow directly from their policy subject to the policy terms.

1 Canada.ca 

2 Turbo Tax

3 Turbo Tax

4 Canda.ca

 


 

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